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Whole exome sequencing and trio analysis to broaden the variant spectrum of genes in idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism


1 Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, NHC Key Laboratory of Reproduction Regulation (Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research), School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200011, China
2 Department of Andrology, Center for Men's Health, Urologic Medical Center, Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200080, China
3 Department of Research Institute, Reproduction Medical Center, The first Hospital of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000, China

Correspondence Address:
Shu-Yan Tang,
Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, NHC Key Laboratory of Reproduction Regulation (Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research), School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200011
China
Zheng Li,
Department of Andrology, Center for Men's Health, Urologic Medical Center, Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200080
China
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/aja.aja_65_20

PMID: 33208564

Dozens of genes are associated with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) and an oligogenic etiology has been suggested. However, the associated genes may account for only approximately 50% cases. In addition, a genomic systematic pedigree analysis is still lacking. Here, we conducted whole exome sequencing (WES) on 18 unrelated men affected by IHH and their corresponding parents. Notably, one reported and 10 novel variants in eight known IHH causative genes (AXL, CCDC141, CHD7, DMXL2, FGFR1, PNPLA6, POLR3A, and PROKR2), nine variants in nine recently reported candidate genes (DCAF17, DCC, EGF, IGSF10, NOTCH1, PDE3A, RELN, SLIT2, and TRAPPC9), and four variants in four novel candidate genes for IHH (CCDC88C, CDON, GADL1, and SPRED3) were identified in 77.8% (14/18) of IHH cases. Among them, eight (8/18, 44.4%) cases carried more than one variant in IHH-related genes, supporting the oligogenic model. Interestingly, we found that those variants tended to be maternally inherited (maternal with n = 17 vs paternal with n = 7; P = 0.028). Our further retrospective investigation of published reports replicated the maternal bias (maternal with n = 46 vs paternal with n = 28; P = 0.024). Our study extended a variant spectrum for IHH and provided the first evidence that women are probably more tolerant to variants of IHH-related genes than men.


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