ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 20  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 454-458

Sperm origins and concentration do not impact the clinical outcomes in intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles


1 Center for Reproductive Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191, China
2 Beijing Key Laboratory of Reproductive Endocrinology and Assisted Reproduction Technology, Beijing 100191, China
3 Key Laboratory of Assisted Reproduction, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100191, China

Correspondence Address:
Jie Qiao
Center for Reproductive Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191, China; Beijing Key Laboratory of Reproductive Endocrinology and Assisted Reproduction Technology, Beijing 100191, China; Key Laboratory of Assisted Reproduction, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100191, China

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aja.aja_27_18

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In the present study, we evaluated the impact of sperm origins and concentration on the clinical outcomes of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles. A total of 1201 ICSI cycles were retrospectively analyzed for male azoospermia or oligozoospermia between January 2015 and December 2015 in the Peking University Third Hospital. Patients were divided into three groups (Group 1 vs Group 2/3; surgically extracted sperm vs ejaculated sperms): Group 1 included 343 ICSI cycles and Group 2 analyzed 388 cycles on semen with sperm concentration <5 × 106 ml−1 (severe oligozoospermia group). Group 3 included 470 cycles with sperm concentration between 5 × 106 ml−1 and 15 × 106 ml−1 (mild oligozoospermia group). Fertilization rates, clinical pregnancy rates, and live birth rates were analyzed and compared among groups of different semen origins and concentrations on the oocyte retrieval day. Group 2 showed a lower fertilization rate than Group 3 (62.9% ± 21.6% vs 66.8% ± 22.1%,P< 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in clinical pregnancy rate per transfer (51.3%, 46.7%, and 50.0%, respectively), live birth rate per transfer (44.4%, 40.9%, and 41.4%, respectively), accumulative live birth rate (58.3%, 51.0%, and 52.1%, respectively), twin birth rate (18.4%, 10.6%, and 12.6%, respectively), and birth defects rate (0, 0.3%, and 0.2%, respectively) among three groups. The results of this study indicated that sperm origins and concentration do not impact the clinical outcomes in ICSI cycles.


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