INVITED REVIEW
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 673-681

Molecular signaling involving intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer


Department of Pharmacy, Centro Interuniversitario di Ricerca sui Peptidi Bioattivi, University of Naples "Federico II", 80134 Naples, Italy

Correspondence Address:
Daniela Marasco
Department of Pharmacy, Centro Interuniversitario di Ricerca sui Peptidi Bioattivi, University of Naples "Federico II", 80134 Naples
Italy
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.181817

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Investigations on cellular protein interaction networks (PINs) reveal that proteins that constitute hubs in a PIN are notably enriched in Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) compared to proteins that constitute edges, highlighting the role of IDPs in signaling pathways. Most IDPs rapidly undergo disorder-to-order transitions upon binding to their biological targets to perform their function. Conformational dynamics enables IDPs to be versatile and to interact with a broad range of interactors under normal physiological conditions where their expression is tightly modulated. IDPs are involved in many cellular processes such as cellular signaling, transcriptional regulation, and splicing; thus, their high-specificity/low-affinity interactions play crucial roles in many human diseases including cancer. Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in men worldwide. Therefore, identifying molecular mechanisms of the oncogenic signaling pathways that are involved in prostate carcinogenesis is crucial. In this review, we focus on the aspects of cellular pathways leading to PCa in which IDPs exert a primary role.


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