ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 852-857

A laboratory modification to testicular sperm preparation technique improves spermatogenic cell yield


1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Center for Assisted Reproduction, Ankara University School of Medicine, Ankara, 06100, Turkey
2 Department of Histology and Embryology, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Ankara University, Ankara, 06110, Turkey
3 Department of Urology, Ankara University School of Medicine, Ankara, 06230, Turkey

Correspondence Address:
Sinan Ozkavukcu
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Center for Assisted Reproduction, Ankara University School of Medicine, Ankara, 06100
Turkey
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.132468

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Testicular sperm extraction is a common procedure used to find spermatogenic cells in men with nonobstructive azoospermia. The laboratory processing of biopsied testicular tissues needs to be performed meticulously to acquire a high yield of cells. In this study, the effectiveness of mincing the tissues after testicular biopsy was assessed using histological evaluation, as was the possible adverse effect of residual tissue on the migration of spermatogenic cells during density gradient centrifugation. Our results indicate that testicular residual tissue, when laid on the density gradient medium along with the sperm wash, hinders the spermatogenic cells' forming a pellet during centrifugation, and therefore impairs the intracytoplasmic sperm injection procedure. Whereas the mean number of recovered cells from the sperm wash medium (SWM) with residual tissue is 39.435 ± 24.849, it was notably higher (60.189 ± 28.214 cells) in the SWM without minced tissues. The remaining tissue contained no functional seminiferous tubules or spermatogenic cells in histological sections. In conclusion, the remaining residual tissue after mincing biopsied testicular tissue does not add any functional or cellular contribution to spermatogenic cell retrieval; in fact, it may block the cellular elements in the accompanying cell suspension from migrating through the gradient layers to form a pellet during centrifugation and cause loss of spermatogenic cells.


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