ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 439-443

Detecting prostate cancer and prostatic calcifications using advanced magnetic resonance imaging


1 Department of Radiology, Henan Provincial People's Hospital and The People's Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450003, Henan, China
2 Department of Postgraduate Education, School of International Education, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001, Henan, China
3 Department of Urology, Henan Provincial People's Hospital and The People's Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450003, Henan, China
4 Department of Radiology, Wayne State University, Detroit 48202, MI, USA
5 Department of Administration, Magnetic Resonance Innovations Inc., Detroit 48202, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Meiyun Wang
Department of Radiology, Henan Provincial People's Hospital and The People's Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450003, Henan, China

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.177840

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Prostate cancer and prostatic calcifications have a high incidence in elderly men. We aimed to investigate the diagnostic capabilities of susceptibility-weighted imaging in detecting prostate cancer and prostatic calcifications. A total number of 156 men, including 34 with prostate cancer and 122 with benign prostate were enrolled in this study. Computed tomography, conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, and susceptibility-weighted imaging were performed on all the patients. One hundred and twelve prostatic calcifications were detected in 87 patients. The sensitivities and specificities of the conventional magnetic resonance imaging, apparent diffusion coefficient, and susceptibility-filtered phase images in detecting prostate cancer and prostatic calcifications were calculated. McNemar's Chi-square test was used to compare the differences in sensitivities and specificities between the techniques. The results showed that the sensitivity and specificity of susceptibility-filtered phase images in detecting prostatic cancer were greater than that of conventional magnetic resonance imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient (P < 0.05). In addition, the sensitivity and specificity of susceptibility-filtered phase images in detecting prostatic calcifications were comparable to that of computed tomography and greater than that of conventional magnetic resonance imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient (P < 0.05). Given the high incidence of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) abnormality in prostate cancer, we conclude that susceptibility-weighted imaging is more sensitive and specific than conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, and computed tomography in detecting prostate cancer. Furthermore, susceptibility-weighted imaging can identify prostatic calcifications similar to computed tomography, and it is much better than conventional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging.


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