ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 368-373

Metabolic syndrome in White-European men presenting for secondary couple's infertility: an investigation of the clinical and reproductive burden


1 Division of Experimental Oncology, Unit of Urology, URI, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, 20132 Milan, Italy
2 Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele, 20132 Milan, Italy
3 Infertility Unit, Unit of Obstetrics/Gynecology, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, 20132 Milan, Italy
4 Research Doctorate Program in Urology, Magna Graecia University, 88020 Catanzaro, Italy

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Andrea Salonia
Division of Experimental Oncology, Unit of Urology, URI, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, 20132 Milan, Italy; Research Doctorate Program in Urology, Magna Graecia University, 88020 Catanzaro, Italy

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.175783

Rights and Permissions

We aimed to determine the impact of metabolic syndrome (MetS) on reproductive function in men with secondary infertility, a condition that has received relatively little attention from researchers. Complete demographic, clinical, and laboratory data from 167 consecutive secondary infertile men were analyzed. Health-significant comorbidities were scored with the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI; categorised 0 vs 1 vs 2 or higher). NCEP-ATP III criteria were used to define MetS. Semen analysis values were assessed based on the 2010 World Health Organization (WHO) reference criteria. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models tested the association between semen parameters and clinical characteristics and MetS. MetS was found in 20 (12%) of 167 men. Patients with MetS were older (P < 0.001) and had a greater BMI (P < 0.001) compared with those without MetS. MetS patients had lower levels of total testosterone (P = 0.001), sex hormone-binding globulin, inhibin B, and anti-Mόllerian hormone (all P ≤ 0.03), and they were hypogonadal at a higher prevalence (P = 0.01) than patients without MetS. Moreover, MetS patients presented lower values of semen volume, sperm concentration, and sperm normal morphology (all P ≤ 0.03). At multivariate logistic regression analysis, no parameters predicted sperm concentration, normal sperm morphology, and total progressive motility. Our data show that almost 1 of 8 White-European men presenting for secondary couple's infertility is diagnosed with MetS. MetS was found to be associated with a higher prevalence of hypogonadism, decreased semen volume, decreased sperm concentration, and normal morphology in a specific cohort of White-European men.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2265    
    Printed111    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded254    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 7    

Recommend this journal