ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 80-90

A systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the effect of sperm DNA damage on in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcome


1 Department of Surgery (Urology), University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
2 Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, St. Mary's Hospital Center, St. Mary's Hospital, 3830 Lacombe Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1M5, Canada
3 Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
4 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Douglas T Carrell
Department of Surgery (Urology), University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, USA

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.182822

Rights and Permissions

Sperm DNA damage is prevalent among infertile men and is known to influence natural reproduction. However, the impact of sperm DNA damage on assisted reproduction outcomes remains controversial. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis of studies on sperm DNA damage (assessed by SCSA, TUNEL, SCD, or Comet assay) and clinical pregnancy after IVF and/or ICSI treatment from MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PUBMED database searches for this analysis. We identified 41 articles (with a total of 56 studies) including 16 IVF studies, 24 ICSI studies, and 16 mixed (IVF + ICSI) studies. These studies measured DNA damage (by one of four assays: 23 SCSA, 18 TUNEL, 8 SCD, and 7 Comet) and included a total of 8068 treatment cycles (3734 IVF, 2282 ICSI, and 2052 mixed IVF + ICSI). The combined OR of 1.68 (95% CI: 1.49-1.89; P < 0.0001) indicates that sperm DNA damage affects clinical pregnancy following IVF and/or ICSI treatment. In addition, the combined OR estimates of IVF (16 estimates, OR = 1.65; 95% CI: 1.34-2.04; P < 0.0001), ICSI (24 estimates, OR = 1.31; 95% CI: 1.08-1.59; P = 0.0068), and mixed IVF + ICSI studies (16 estimates, OR = 2.37; 95% CI: 1.89-2.97; P < 0.0001) were also statistically significant. There is sufficient evidence in the existing literature suggesting that sperm DNA damage has a negative effect on clinical pregnancy following IVF and/or ICSI treatment.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed4018    
    Printed206    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded760    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 10    

Recommend this journal