INVITED ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 525-529

Race-specific genetic risk score is more accurate than nonrace-specific genetic risk score for predicting prostate cancer and high-grade diseases


1 Department of Urology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China; Fudan Institute of Urology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China; Program for Personalized Cancer Care, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, Illinois, USA; Health Communication Institute, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
2 Department of Urology, Shanghai Cancer Center, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
3 Department of Urology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China
4 Fudan Institute of Urology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
5 Division of Urology, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, Illinois, USA
6 Program for Personalized Cancer Care, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, Illinois, USA
7 Department of Urology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai; Fudan Institute of Urology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
8 Department of Urology, Shanghai Changhai Hospital, The Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China
9 Department of Medical Ultrasonic, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China
10 Center for Genomic and Personalized Medicine, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, China
11 Fudan Institute of Urology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China; Program for Personalized Cancer Care, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, Illinois, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Jianfeng Xu
Fudan Institute of Urology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China; Program for Personalized Cancer Care, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, Illinois, USA

Dr. Yinghao Sun
Department of Urology, Shanghai Changhai Hospital, The Second Military Medical University, Shanghai
China
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.179857

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Genetic risk score (GRS) based on disease risk-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is an informative tool that can be used to provide inherited information for specific diseases in addition to family history. However, it is still unknown whether only SNPs that are implicated in a specific racial group should be used when calculating GRSs. The objective of this study is to compare the performance of race-specific GRS and nonrace-specific GRS for predicting prostate cancer (PCa) among 1338 patients underwent prostate biopsy in Shanghai, China. A race-specific GRS was calculated with seven PCa risk-associated SNPs implicated in East Asians (GRS7), and a nonrace-specific GRS was calculated based on 76 PCa risk-associated SNPs implicated in at least one racial group (GRS76). The means of GRS7 and GRS76 were 1.19 and 1.85, respectively, in the study population. Higher GRS7 and GRS76 were independent predictors for PCa and high-grade PCa in univariate and multivariate analyses. GRS7 had a better area under the receiver-operating curve (AUC) than GRS76 for discriminating PCa (0.602 vs 0.573) and high-grade PCa (0.603 vs 0.575) but did not reach statistical significance. GRS7 had a better (up to 13% at different cutoffs) positive predictive value (PPV) than GRS76. In conclusion, a race-specific GRS is more robust and has a better performance when predicting PCa in East Asian men than a GRS calculated using SNPs that are not shown to be associated with East Asians.


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